CRC Section: 6 Steps to Align Contact Center KPIs with Customer Experience Strategies

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Does your organization have a Customer Experience strategy? And, have you implemented either Net Promoter or Customer Effort Scores?

Like most managers, you might feel these metrics provide value to your organization. After all, you can’t manage what you can’t measure. At the same time, you are not sure who or what is in control. A recent article published by Forrester Research challenges these type of one question metrics as it’s hard understand how to influence it.

This process is similar to measuring your blood pressure or body temperature. You can see the score, but determining the cause requires more analysis.

In the early days of call centers, we used pseudo metrics to determine if customers would be happy with the service provided. Metrics such as Service Level, Abandoned Rate and Average Time to Answer were all created to tell us the service was good enough against the corresponding budget spend. But strong operational metrics do not always equate to a good customer experience.

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Data Integration Section: Essential Steps in the Data Integration Process

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People usually oversimplify data integration by assuming it involves only extract, transform and load (ETL) tools. Though critical, an ETL tool is just one piece of a complex puzzle. The data integration framework (DIF) encompasses two categories of processes. The first category is the process to determine your data requirements and solution. The second is the process used to physically gather the data from its sources and transform it into information that businesspeople can use to analyze and make decisions.

Determining your data requirements includes:

  • Gathering business requirements
  • Determining data and quality needs
  • Data profiling or understanding data sources and associated quality both in the source system and across multiple source systems, if applicable
  • Performing a data quality assessment against the metrics the business has requested
  • Defining the gap between what data is available and its quality versus what the business has requested
  • Revising business expectations or project costs and determining the selected data solution
  • Modeling the data stores necessary ­– staging areas, data warehouse, operational data store and data mart(s) –­ both from a logical perspective (to confirm business requirements) and a physical perspective (to enable implementation).

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Analytics Section: Five Secrets to kick-off Analytics Project

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It’s still not easy to deliver analytics capabilities, and business expectations for success are at an all-time high. On one hand, the trend has given valuable exposure and funding to some programs. On the other, the data challenges of analytics – accessing, cleansing, integrating, analyzing and acting on results – are arguably greater than ever before, thanks to big data, social media data and sophisticated new analytic requirements. This is uncharted territory for many organizations, demanding new approaches and best practices.

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Banking Section:Banks designed for humans, not money

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The bank that moves to remote servicing must still find ways to get the customer to feel a relationship, and you don’t feel or have a relationship with your mobile or tablet computer.

This new engagement is allowed because the cash disappears, as does the security issue, and far more of the branch front-office focus is allowed to focus upon the customer dialogue and interaction.

It then struck me that banks like Caja Navarro and ING Direct were instigating community engagement by having open house sessions.  Caja Navarro in Spain offered evening classes in their stores (braches) including hair styling and flower arranging, whilst ING Direct in the USA were offering sessions where anyone could just ask questions like: “how does a mortgage work?”

Umpqua did something similar, where the bank could be booked in the evening for cocktail parties or business meetings, rather than leaving the branch space dead in those hours.

This is because there is no money in the branch anymore; the money is in the data.

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Auto Section:Toyota overtakes BMW as most valuable global car brand

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Toyota has overtaken BMW as the most valuable automotive brand, an annual ranking of the world’s top brands shows.

The value of the Toyota, Mercedes-Benz, Audi and Hyundai brands improved by double-digit percentages compared with 2012, largely because of strong demand in China and the United States, according to the BrandZ Top 100 Most Valuable Global Brands study released by market research company Millward Brown on Monday.

Toyota’s 2013 brand value rose 12 percent to $24.5 billion largely because of its significant inroads in the hybrid market, according to the study. It ranked No. 23 on the overall list.

“Toyota is carving out a very big position in hybrids across its range, which is tapping into the consumer need for value by saving fuel cost,” Peter Walshe, Millward Brown global brand director, told Automotive News. “Its hybrids are reinforcing the experience of the brand, and in so doing, Toyota continues to magnify what is special and different about it.”

Honda finished No. 71 on the list with a value of $12.40 billion, down 2 percent.

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Digital Section: Twitter Lets Brands Reach Viewers of Their TV Ads

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Twitter also announced it would work with a number of media companies, including Time Inc., Bloomberg, Discovery, Vevo, Vice Media, Condé Nast Entertainment and Warner Music Group, to sell advertisers content, in a partnership called Twitter Amplify. The content will probably be digital video or television content like clips from shows. It can then be shared on Twitter, and advertisers can run ads before the videos are viewed.

The format is similar to a partnership Twitter announced last year with ESPN and Ford, which embedded replays from football games in posts sent via Twitter. ESPN and Ford promoted the posts to people who had been identified as being interested in sports based on the accounts they followed on Twitter and the subjects of their posts.

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Marketing Section: Analytics and personalisation drive leading marketer behaviour

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The results of the latest The State of Marketing 2013, IBM’s Global Survey of Marketers are based on responses from 500 marketing managers globally.

Given the choice of nominating their top three marketing challenges, acquiring new customers proved the most significant, with 42 per cent of votes. This was followed by retaining existing customers and improving loyalty and satisfaction (36 per cent); creating consistent, relevant and positive customer experiences across all channels (34 per cent); understanding social media and using social channels effectively (34 per cent); and managing, collecting and making use of internal and external data (29 per cent).

Further down the list was measuring ROI (21 per cent) and protecting customer data (21 per cent). Alongside its top-line findings, IBM used the survey to compare ‘leading marketers’ against their peers in an effort to detail their ability to generate better outcomes and performances. IBM defined leading marketers as the top 20 per cent of the survey mix, who are proactively influencing the customer experience across channels as well as using marketing technologies to help with cross-channel optimisation.

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